Work starts on transforming historic British Waterways building into apartments

Work has commenced at the British Waterways building (LDRS)
Work has commenced at the British Waterways building (LDRS)
By Joe Locker, Local Democracy Reporter

Work has started on transforming Nottingham’s historic British Waterways building into apartments.

The Grade II listed building, in Nottingham’s Castle Wharf, was originally built in around 1919 and used for the storage and loading of goods and materials onto canal barges.

It had previously been known as the Trent Navigation Company warehouse, which was converted for leisure use as part of the 1996 Castle Wharf regeneration.

Most recently the warehouse building was home to a Wetherspoon pub, The Company Inn, as well as a gym and comedy club.

Plans to convert the building into 95 apartments were given the green light by Nottingham City Council’s planning committee in September 2022.

The scheme is being developed by H2O urban and property company bloc, in partnership with the Canal and River Trust.

It is being funded by Citra Living, part of Lloyds Banking Group.

The partners announced work had started on June 5. The project is expected to be complete by March 2025.

Andy Hutchinson, chief executive of Citra Living, said: “Bringing disused buildings back into use and regenerating areas into new communities is central to what Citra Living is about.

“Regenerating the warehouse at Castle Wharf will bring much needed homes to the area, allowing more people to live in the type of quality homes they want in the areas that give them access to the facilities and amenities they want.”

The building will be converted to feature 95 apartments for rent, including 12 studios, 42 one-bedroom and 41 two-bedroom apartments.

A rooftop extension will feature eight penthouse apartments.

Work has now commenced at the British Waterways building (LDRS)
Work has now commenced at the British Waterways building (LDRS)

Alongside internal changes, the building itself will be restored.

A number of existing canopies will be removed and areas of brickwork will be re-pointed.

Owing to the building’s historical significance and protections, previous planning reports said the developer must not use power tools in any masonry repair work.

Only hooked tools or masonry chisels may be used and prepared brick faces must be brushed down with a bristle brush.

A special mortar mix is also required in any repair work, while sands must comply with English Heritage specifications.

Citra Living has appointed surveying and construction company Rund to undertake technical due diligence.

It will also monitor the project and see it through to completion.

Tom French, associate director at Rund, added: “This redevelopment project draws on our specialism in managing Build to Rent projects through to successful completion, while also benefiting from our expertise in dealing with sensitive listed building conversions, safeguarding heritage for future generations.

“Once completed, the scheme will breathe new life into a historic building in a prime waterside location, making it an exceptional place to live.”

Work is being done by Jessops Construction Limited.

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