Father who survived sepsis after thinking he had heavy cold returns to QMC where life was saved

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Karl Goodere-Dale launching a new patient information leaflet with the QMC sepsis team (Credit: Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust)

A 36-year-old father from Beeston who survived sepsis after thinking he had a ‘heavy cold’ has returned to the hospital where his life was saved.

Karl Goodere-Dale thought he was suffering from a ‘heavy cold’ but collapsed within hours and was rushed to the QMC.

Doctors then diagnosed him with sepsis, a rare but serious complication of an infection which, without quick treatment, can lead to organ failure or even result in death.

He was taken to intensive care and eventually made a full recovery after spending eight weeks in hospital – he now faces an 18 month recovery period.

Karl said: “I hadn’t heard about sepsis before, I don’t think many people have, but it is serious.

“When I got to hospital they quickly took me to resuscitation and I was in a bad way, bringing up blood.

“I knew something was wrong by the way I was being monitored.

“I was thinking ‘this is it, this is serious, my family are going to be without me’ – I was worried about leaving my children and them growing up on their own.

“I remember asking the doctor to not let me die and he said they were doing all they could to make sure that doesn’t happen.”

Video: Karl on sepsis awareness (Credit: Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust)

Karl has now returned to the QMC where he has joined the medical team to launch a new sepsis information leaflet for patients as a way of thanks.

He said: “I think the leaflet is a good idea – information does need to be given out to both patients and relatives and it is important that people understand it and are aware of what it is.

“I went through a real roller-coaster of emotions.

“I was glad that I was alive and grateful for the help I had and the swift way I was treated because without that, I am certain I wouldn’t be here right now.

“Thanks to the team it means I can see my children grow up.”

Video: Karl on the new leaflet (Credit: Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust)

The new leaflet will be given to people leaving the emergency department having attended with an infection and offers advice on sepsis symptoms.

Sally Wood, sepsis lead nurse at the Trust which runs the QMC, said: “The Trust has come a long way during the last ten years and that is due to hard work and dedication across the board.

“It means we have some of the best outcomes for sepsis patients in the country and that means people like Karl are able to go home to their families which is what we all want to see.

“Karl’s experience led us to develop the new leaflet and we hope it will raise awareness and help save lives.”

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